Certified Seed Wheat

Certified Seed Wheat

Certified Seed Wheat

Every year, Tom Pauly Seed chooses wheat varieties it believes will be the best suited for customers in south-central Kansas and Oklahoma. We have raised these varieties and can give you the best in-depth knowledge about traits and potential yields. Varieties available in 2017

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(The following excerpts are from “Wheat varieties for Kansas and the Great Plains: 2015” by Steve Watson. )


WB 4458

This is a new variety from WestBred. It was in the 2014 and 2013 K-State and OSU tests, and generally had good to excellent yields, especially in central Kansas and Oklahoma. WB 4458 should be used on better dryland acres. It should not be planted on very tough dryland fields. It can handle drought well, but it doesn’t have as much drought tolerance as Winterhawk. WB 4458 may look a little thin at times. Stem density is not as great as some varieties but yields are quite good due to test weight, seed size and number of seeds per head. Its leaf disease package is not very strong, but not extremely weak, either. In a year with heavier disease pressure than in 2014, you may need to protect its yield potential with a fungicide. It has a very good staygreen capability, keeping its leaves greener than most through periods of stress. WB 4458 is a medium-maturing variety with excellent straw strength and medium height.

Strengths

  • Excellent yield record
  • Excellent straw strength
  • Very good drought tolerance

Weaknesses

  • Moderately susceptible to tan spot
  • Less desirable baking quality

Special notes on cultural practices

  • Best suited for good dryland fields

WB Cedar

This WestBred variety has become one of the top varieties in central and eastern Kansas and northern Oklahoma, and under irrigation in western Kansas. It can get short under tough dryland conditions in western Kansas and its yield record at dryland locations in western Kansas in K-State tests has mostly been only average or a  little above.

WB Cedar’s  performance in 2014 in Kansas was more uneven than in previous years. It is a high tillering variety, but needs to establish and tiler well in the fall to reach its potential, and conditions were not conducive to that in parts of Kansas and Oklahoma in the 2013/14 season. Also, it was early enough to have some spring freeze injury, and was a little shorter than usual because of the drought. In the spring, once it starts into reproductive mode it keeps going a steady pace. If it doesn’t have enough tillers by then, it doesn’t adapt to changing conditions by increasing growth or sending out more tillers. Overall, its yield record in the 2013 and 2012 K-State tests  was excellent. It was hurt a bit by freeze injury in the 2014 and 2013 OSU tests, but had an excellent record in the 2012 OSU tests.

WB Cedar may need to be sprayed for leaf rust some years, but it is moderately resistant to stripe rust. It has good staygreen and holds its leaves better than most early varieties. It fills well.

Strengths

  • High-end yield potential
  • Excellent straw strength
  • Moderately resistant to stripe rust

Weaknesses

  • Can be short under drought conditions
  • Moderately susceptible to wheat streak mosaic

LCS Mint

This newer variety from Limagrain Cereal Seeds had a very good year in the 2014 K-State and OSU tests. Its performance in the 2013 tests was also good. This is one of the top new varieties for Kansas, Oklahoma and Colorado. It is a medium-maturity variety. It appears to be photoperiod sensitive, meaning its maturity relative to others can vary a bit from year to year. In a year where most varieties are running later than usual because of a  cool spring, LCS Mint will appear to be relatively early. And in a year when everything is earlier than normal (such as 2012), LC Mint will wait for the right daylength before heading, so will appear to be later than it really is. LCS Mint has avery good acid soil tolerance. It is also resistant to stripe rust. It is susceptible to leaf rust, however. Its drought tolerance is excellent. It also has excellent milling and baking quality.

Strengths

  • Very good acid soil tolerance
  • Resistant to stripe rust
  • Excellent milling and baking quality
  • Excellent drought tolerance

Weaknesses

  • Susceptible to leaf rust
  • Can lodge under irrigation

Special notes on cultural practices

  • Don’t put on too much nitrogen under irrigation

 

Everest

This new variety from Kansas Wheat Alliance had solid, if unspectacular, field reports from eastern and central Kansas and Oklahoma in 2014. It remains the “go-to” variety for these areas. Its yield record in K-State tests was fairly average in 2014 and 2013, but very good in 2012. Everest may need to be sprayed for either stripe rust or tan spots. In the absence of those leaf diseases, it has very few other weaknesses in central and eastern Kansas. Everest is not a high-tillering variety. It needs to get established well and tiller in the fall to make top yields. It cannot easily make up for a poor start by tillering a lot in the spring. In some years, however, its lower tillering tendency can help it survive years when stress occurs late. It will not get too lush when conditions are good early, so it stays within itself when conditions turn hot and dry late in the season. It fills well under stress.

Everest has Hessian fly resistance and intermediate tolerance to scab. It is more resistant to barley yellow dwarf than most varieties, but will become infected under moderate to heavy pressure. Everest seems to tolerate mid-season drought stress well, but does not tolerate early-season drought in the fall. It sets most of its tillers in the fall, and needs to get established well and start tillering in the fall to do well. When conditions are very dry in the fall. Everest may not perform well. It is well-suited for irrigation.

Strengths

  • Consistent performance
  • Moderately resistant to Hessian fly
  • Most resistant to barley yellow dwarf

Weaknesses

  • Susceptible to tan spot
  • Less desirable baking quality
  • Susceptible to stripe rust

Doublestop CL+

This is a newer 2-gene Clearfield wheat from OSU and marketed by Oklahoma Genetics, Inc. By having two genes for herbicide tolerance, Doublestop CL+ has much better tolerance to Beyond herbicide than on-gene Clearfield varieties. You can also use methylated seed oil (MSO) with Beyond when making the herbicide application to this variety, which can improve control of feral rye, cheatgrasses, jointed goatgrass an other problem grasses. Doublestop CL+ has generally had better yield record so far in K-State tests than in OSU tests. Its yields have been especially good in eastern and central Kansas. There were no leaf diseasese in 2014 . If leaf diseases are a problem, it will do best if sprayed with a fungicide. It is resistant to soilborne mosaic and tolerant to acid soils, which gives it adaptability to both central and western Oklahoma and Kansas. Its pedigree includes a wide range of different lines and varieties, giving it a well-buffered genetic background.

Strengths

  • Very good yield potential
  • Very good test weights
  • Long coleoptile
  • Strong herbicide tolerance fro Clearfield system

Weaknesses

  • Not the strongest leaf disease package

Special notes on cultural practices

  • Adapted to both central and western areas
  • Two-gene Clearfield variety for improved crop safety and feral rye control